The Memory: Interview with Judith Barrow

Fellow author Judith Barrow‘s novel, The Memory, came out this year and I can vouch for it being a gripping and very moving read. I’ve interviewed her about it – well, cornered her and demanded answers – and this is what she had to say. Q: You’ve written four volumes of a family saga aboutContinue reading “The Memory: Interview with Judith Barrow”

Home, Hearth and Murder: domestic drama

Back in 1816, Jane Austen (yes, I always try to bring her into anything if I can) commiserated with her nephew when he reported that he had lost two whole chapters of his own tentative novel. She hadn’t stolen them, she promised. “What should I do with your strong, manly, spirited Sketches, full of VarietyContinue reading “Home, Hearth and Murder: domestic drama”

Horseshoe Nails and other consequences

2020 is drawing to an end and not before time. Things will change. Once we have finished wiping out our elderly, infirm and vulnerable by being stupid over Christmas, vaccines will be administered and Covid 19 will recede. Hope is on the horizon and so is the great unknown. Time to reprise my post fromContinue reading “Horseshoe Nails and other consequences”

Shell Shock – Legacy of the Trenches #WW1 — Judith Barrow

Image courtesy of the Mirror The First World War ended with the deaths of a generation of young men. But the devastation of the  conflict didn’t end with that last blast of a howitzer. Thousands of soldiers went home still re-living their horrific experiences of the battlefields for many years. Their lives were damaged by […]Continue reading “Shell Shock – Legacy of the Trenches #WW1 — Judith Barrow”

Long Shadows: historical minds

Although I write crime novels, I feel happiest writing historical fiction. History was always my favourite subject at school – not the history of kings, generals and politicians but the history of everyday life and the exploration of a past when people thought, felt and believed differently. When I wrote Shadows, I set it inContinue reading “Long Shadows: historical minds”

Drawing a Likeness: describing characters

How much detail do you give in describing a character’s appearance? Do you convey with precision the shape of their nose, their eyes, their lips, their hair, the quality of their skin, the size of their waist, or do you leave it vague? I have read and enjoyed cinematic book in which every detail isContinue reading “Drawing a Likeness: describing characters”

Sealed with a Kiss: The End

I often have difficulty knowing how to start a book, even when I have the whole story clear in my mind. But it can be even more difficult knowing when to stop. Don’t spoil the impact of the natural ending by drifting on into slow sludge. Sorry, Shakespeare, but you should really have stopped whenContinue reading “Sealed with a Kiss: The End”

Believe It Or Not: paranormal fiction

When my father left the air force at the end of World War II with a bit of money in his pocket, he spent some of it on a complete set of the latest edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica. I still have it, well worn, with some of the 24 spines barely legible any more.Continue reading “Believe It Or Not: paranormal fiction”

In Praise of Dots…

“He threw his manly arms around her, carried her to the bed and …” That was how scenes involving people, you know, DOING IT, used to end. Dot dot dot. Leaving school girls giggling and fantasising about what the dots actually implied. Then baldly honest liberation intervened, the dots disappeared and we readers were draggedContinue reading “In Praise of Dots…”

My Review of The Visitor: A Post-Apocalyptic Murder Mystery by Terry Tyler #FridayReads #GreatReads

Originally posted on Judith Barrow:
Book Description: n 2024, a mystery virus ravages the entire world. ‘Bat Fever’ is highly contagious and one hundred per cent lethal. A cottage tucked away in an isolated Norfolk village seems like the ideal place to sit out a catastrophic pandemic, but some residents of Hincham resent the arrival…