How I Write by Cheryl Rees-Price

Originally posted on Crime Cymru:
In our How I Write series, our Crime Cymru authors share their insights into the writing process. This week, Cheryl Rees-Price gives a beautifully clear step-by-step guide to plotting and preparation and offers some great tips for aspiring writers. When I wrote my first book I picked up a pen and started writing…

Writing What You Don’t Know by Eamonn Griffin

Originally posted on Crime Cymru:
Each week, we invite our Crime Cymru writers to tell us a bit about themselves and their writing. This week, Eamonn Griffin gets himself into a bit of research-related bother. Writing What You Don’t Know by Eamonn Griffin One of those often-repeated maxims about writing is to write what you…

Christmas starts now. Or it used to.

I am nicking this post, looking at the history of Christmas, from my business website which won’t be there for much longer (I am officially retired!) In 350AD the Pope decreed that the feast of Christ’s Nativity should be held on December 25. This was fortunate because in Northern Europe it was essential to findContinue reading “Christmas starts now. Or it used to.”

In Praise of Libraries

I was at an event in a library a couple of years ago, chatting with author Roz Watkins about crime writing. The library was Newport Community Library. No, not that Newport, the other very small ancient borough in Pembrokeshire. It is maintained by volunteers and donations because all around the country small libraries are beingContinue reading “In Praise of Libraries”

Welcoming Guest Author Judith Barrow

Originally posted on Write Minds:
We welcome Judith Barrow today, talking about her research and settings Hello Judith, and welcome to the blog. First of all, could we ask what kind of research you do? Writing historical family sagas necessitates a lot of research. It’s what I enjoy. It’s fun discovering the fashions of an…

So Clear, So Obvious

There’s a difference between writing history and writing historical fiction, but sometimes the two can overlap. Write about a real historical character and the author has to do all the research that an academic historian would. The facts are there and cannot be changed. The difference is that the author of fiction is free toContinue reading “So Clear, So Obvious”